USDA OSEC Denies Disabled Veteran Firms Accommodations

USDA- US Dept. of Agriculture

The USDA has a notorious history of discrimination against people of color but what happens when it is people of color who are discriminating against another person of color; nothing! Because the USDA is a non-compliant agency when it comes to disability discrimination. Simply mention the word “accommodation” to a USDA OSEC employee will result in a dumb founded “huh.” NVSB and DSHE has spent the last two years explaining to USDA and OSEC (Office of the Secretary)  about disability discrimination.

Last year Disabled Students in Higher Education had a meeting with OSEC where NVSB paid the 2500 dollars it took to attend the meeting. OSEC promised to work with DSHE during the year to make sure DSHE’s accommodation requests were met in 2017. OSEC promptly ignored DSHE and NVSB multiple requests for accommodations meetings. OSEC did not respond until the Grant in Question ( Socially Disadvantaged Farmer/Rancher Grant emphasis on Veterans) was released on Federal Register last week. NVSB had included Deputy Director David King of the USDA ASCR ( USDA Discrimination Complaints Department) on all communication with OSEC, in order to make sure of compliance with accommodation request of a meeting to discuss accommodations- DENIED. Reasons for the review of submittal grant application since OSEC nor Grants.gov will validate the 2501 grant applications until “After” submission deadline has passed and there is no more time for corrections that the disabled need and are afforded under the Americans with Disabilities Act if they as for a simple accommodation. This a simple accommodation but USDA has a history of denying any accommodations I have made even in employment mediation where an accommodation was promised but refused to be documented in the hiring process invalidating the mediation and position.

The USDA has settled with all class of protected citizens except the disabled. NVSB and DSHE asked that any Disability Attorneys reading our blog contact us for a potential multimillion dollars class action against the USDA for violating the ADA, and other rights of the disabled including disabled veterans. Please read the following correspondence to understand what DSHE and NVSB has been through trying to get a simple accommodation from the USDA.

 

“1
National Veterans Service Bureau
From: National Veterans Service Bureau <info@nvsb.org>
Sent: Monday, July 3, 2017 4:15 PM
To: ‘Nicholas, Kenya – OSEC’; ‘vnc@nvsb.org’; ‘ruth@nvsb.org’
Cc: ‘sam_burke@blunt.senate.gov’; ‘asher_allman@blunt.senate.gov’; ‘Lesch, Sheree – OSEC’; ‘Obineme,
Christian -OSEC’; ‘Wise, Brenda – OSEC’; ‘Klocke, Justin (McCaskill)’
Subject: RE: Regarding USDA and Protected class of citizens
Signed By: info@nvsb.org
Kenya, the real issue is the fact that Grants.gov accepted the Grant previously and your agency accepted the Grant.gov
submitted Grant, in that submission the grant application was supposed to be reviewed for compliance to the grant
submission, that means 12 point font, 1 inch margins and a grant summary only 15 pages long. If my grant would have
been rejected for not following the Grants.gov instructions upon sumnittal then I would have been able to rectifiy the
submission but after reading the instructions I was mislead by your instructions.
Therefore my Accommodation requests is reasonable to clarify your instructions, you offered people to work with me
during the year I called and emailed you several times BEFORE the submission, I even asked for another meeting before
the submission, both of which was DENIED via lack of response( I can send you the read receipts from you).
If you are refusing another meeting then I guess I had better file an ASCR complaint prior to the end of submission time ,
ASCR I will call you with my complaint on Wednesday July 6th.
Vincent Cannady
17472 S. 2950 Road, El Dorado Springs, Mo 64744
Phone 202‐816‐1887‐ Fax 877‐576‐9621
Email vnc@nvsb.org On the Web www.nvsb.org
DETERMINED TO SUCCEED
2
“There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work, and learning from failure.”
By Colin Powell
From: Nicholas, Kenya ‐ OSEC [mailto:Kenya.Nicholas@osec.usda.gov]
Sent: Monday, July 3, 2017 3:29 PM
To: National Veterans Service Bureau <info@nvsb.org>; vnc@nvsb.org; ruth@nvsb.org
Cc: sam_burke@blunt.senate.gov; asher_allman@blunt.senate.gov; Lesch, Sheree ‐ OSEC
<Sheree.Lesch@osec.usda.gov>; Obineme, Christian ‐OSEC <Christian.Obineme@osec.usda.gov>; Wise, Brenda ‐ OSEC
<Brenda.Wise@osec.usda.gov>; ‘Klocke, Justin (McCaskill)’ <Justin_Klocke@mccaskill.senate.gov>
Subject: RE: Regarding USDA and Protected class of citizens
Mr. Cannady,
I believe there is some confusion. The ADA does not provide for “accommodation” to assist you in securing a
grant. The ADA accommodation under section 508 is to ensure you are not discriminated against as a disabled
individual seeking employment or access to federal programs and services. If for some reason you cannot
access the electronic Federal Register notice or the Grants.gov website, we can provide an alternative means for
submitting your application. Anything otherwise would violate the standards of Ethics and the Grants
Management regulations.
We are not authorized to provide a meeting to review and evaluate the sufficiency of your grant proposal prior
to submission. As I understand, you are requesting a meeting to discuss “the grant and ways we can avoid the
same mistakes… and a review of the submission with a member of the staff for completeness prior to
submittal.” Our Grants Program Office is constrained by the grants management federal regulations from
providing such a review to any applicant.
To review any application outside of the established process would provide an unfair advantage to that
applicant. As you noted, me and my staff already met with you and provided feedback on your submission
from last fiscal year. During that meeting, you mentioned that you had someone that could review your
proposal, as recommended. At this point in the 2017 grant cycle, we are constrained by Grant regulations from
providing you or your company with any assistance that is not available to the rest of the applicants. A review
of your application would constitute providing you with assistance not available to other applicants.
I hope this helps. If you have additional questions, please feel free to respond to this message or call me using
the contact information below.
Best regards,
^xÇçt a|v{ÉÄtá
Program Director – Office of Advocacy and Outreach
United States Department of Agriculture
Office: 202‐720‐6350
Direct: 202‐692‐0098
3
From: National Veterans Service Bureau [mailto:info@nvsb.org]
Sent: Tuesday, June 27, 2017 2:25 PM
To: Nicholas, Kenya ‐ OSEC <Kenya.Nicholas@osec.usda.gov>; vnc@nvsb.org; ruth@nvsb.org
Cc: King, David ‐ASCR <David.King@ascr.usda.gov>; sam_burke@blunt.senate.gov; asher_allman@blunt.senate.gov;
Lesch, Sheree ‐ OSEC <Sheree.Lesch@osec.usda.gov>; Obineme, Christian ‐OSEC <Christian.Obineme@osec.usda.gov>;
Wise, Brenda ‐ OSEC <Brenda.Wise@osec.usda.gov>; ‘Klocke, Justin (McCaskill)’ <Justin_Klocke@mccaskill.senate.gov>
Subject: RE: Regarding USDA and Protected class of citizens
Kenya, thank you for getting back to me. The reason I did not mention the “specific” accommodations is that I am not
aware of what accommodations your program could offer. According to Sheree, what I was requesting could not be
given. I have read all the rules but we at NVSB would like a meeting to discuss those specific rules mentioned in the CFR.
So therefore I will compile a list of accommodations we would like and think are “reasonable” accommodations if you
can provide me with a list of what USDA OSEC considers reasonable in your application process.
What we wanted was a review with the 2501 Grant program for completeness of our application, to make sure we do
not go through what we did last year, submitting a 60 page Statement when all that was required was a 15 page
summary. According to your own assessment if we would have submitted our document with one inch margins, 15 page
summary with 1 page Abstract we would have gotten the grant based upon our service program which has the support
of Missouri’s members of Congress.
Therefore NVSB would like a meeting as an accommodation to discuss the grant and ways we can avoid the same
mistakes made in the submittal basically a repeat the second meeting we had in January which was in person and cost
NVSB 2500 dollars to attend, the first being in Cleveland at 2501 Grant “party” where we learned we did not get the
grant.
In that meeting we would like to hear all of the instances where NVSB could possibly not AWARDED the 2501 Grant
What we can do to insure we submit all documents
Finally we would like to review the submission with a member of staff for completeness prior to submittal.
Sheree had said the last accommodation request was impossible, but we remind you of our rights as an ADA company.
To deny us you would have to find our request unreasonable. Accommodations are made to ensure fairness to the
disabled not to make it easier for the disabled. Filling out a grant application such as this is stressful and I am the CEO
who suffers from PTSD a stress disorder therefore your denial would have to address why our request is not reasonable
based upon our disability. We reserve the right to add more or detract accommodations depending on the reaction of
OSEC prior to submission. This establishes that NVSB did indeed requests accommodations which seemed unclear to
OSEC in the 2016 submission for the 2501 Grant Program
Thank You in advance.
VR,
4
Vincent Cannady
17472 S. 2950 Road, El Dorado Springs, Mo 64744
Phone 202‐816‐1887‐ Fax 877‐576‐9621
Email vnc@nvsb.org On the Web www.nvsb.org
DETERMINED TO SUCCEED
“There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work, and learning from failure.”
By Colin Powell
From: Nicholas, Kenya ‐ OSEC [mailto:Kenya.Nicholas@osec.usda.gov]
Sent: Tuesday, June 27, 2017 12:46 PM
To: National Veterans Service Bureau <info@nvsb.org>
Cc: King, David ‐ASCR <David.King@ascr.usda.gov>; ruthc@dshe.org; madembad@dshe.org; Lesch, Sheree ‐ OSEC
<Sheree.Lesch@osec.usda.gov>; Obineme, Christian ‐OSEC <Christian.Obineme@osec.usda.gov>; Wise, Brenda ‐ OSEC
<Brenda.Wise@osec.usda.gov>; ‘Klocke, Justin (McCaskill)’ <Justin_Klocke@mccaskill.senate.gov>
Subject: RE: Regarding USDA and Protected class of citizens
Dear Mr. Cannady,
Thank you for your interest in our program and for your inquiry regarding an ADA accommodation for your
company. While your request (see the email below) does not identify the type of accommodation you are
seeking, under section 508 of the ADA, we can provide you with an alternative application format to apply for
the grant.
Please reply to this email with a request for accommodation which outlines your specific needs to access the
application. Your request must be detailed in nature regarding the actual accommodation needed to properly
assist you.
Lastly, the OSDBU contact is Michelle Warren (Acting Director) at 202-720-7835.
Thank you again for your interest in our program.
^xÇçt a|v{ÉÄtá
Program Director – Office of Advocacy and Outreach
United States Department of Agriculture
Office: 202‐720‐6350
Direct: 202‐692‐0098
5
From: National Veterans Service Bureau [mailto:info@nvsb.org]
Sent: Tuesday, June 27, 2017 12:05 PM
To: Nicholas, Kenya ‐ OSEC <Kenya.Nicholas@osec.usda.gov>; ‘Klocke, Justin (McCaskill)’
<Justin_Klocke@mccaskill.senate.gov>
Cc: King, David ‐ASCR <David.King@ascr.usda.gov>; ruthc@dshe.org; madembad@dshe.org; Lesch, Sheree ‐ OSEC
<Sheree.Lesch@osec.usda.gov>
Subject: RE: Regarding USDA and Protected class of citizens
Hello Kenya,
As I have stated in my previous email NVSB would like OSEC USDA to grant NVSB an ADA Accommodation during the
2501 Grant Application process. I have attempted to call you and email you numerous times about the 2501
Accommodation. Therefore NVSB is requesting another meeting to discuss our Accommodation requests. Please advise
of a scheduled time where you can have a web conference about our accommodation requests already submitted to
you.
Justin, can you provided Kenya Nichols with an LOS for NVSB VOC Program for the 2501 Grant Program Submission due
August 7th 2017. I have attached the FSA VOC Grant LOS for Kenya’s records but it is better to have an LOS that
specifically mentions the 2501 Grant Program
https://www.outreach.usda.gov/grants/
Thank You All,
VR
Hell
Vincent Cannady
17472 S. 2950 Road, El Dorado Springs, Mo 64744
Phone 202‐816‐1887‐ Fax 877‐576‐9621
Email vnc@nvsb.org On the Web www.nvsb.org
DETERMINED TO SUCCEED
6
“There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work, and learning from failure.”
By Colin Powell
From: Nicholas, Kenya ‐ OSEC [mailto:Kenya.Nicholas@osec.usda.gov]
Sent: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 9:07 AM
To: vincentc@dshe.org
Cc: King, David ‐ASCR <David.King@ascr.usda.gov>; ruthc@dshe.org; madembad@dshe.org
Subject: RE: Regarding USDA and Protected class of citizens
Good morning Mr. Cannady. Please see the following individuals for additional assistance in gaining access to
USDA programs and services that could assist veterans. I would like to reiterate that most of our programs are
administered in the state offices and you will be rerouted to the field offices as appropriate.
The Agricultural Veteran Liaison is Jamie Woods and can be reached at: jamie.woods@ars.usda.gov
Office of Advocacy and Outreach (202-720-6350)
Kenya Nicholas (kenya.nicholas@osec.usda.gov) – Outreach Coordinator/2501 Program Manager
Phyllis Holmes (Phyllis.Holmes@osec.usda.gov) – Acting 1890 National Scholars Program Manager
Lawrence Shorty (lawrence.shorty@osec.usda.gov) – Tribal Colleges and Universities
Jessica Castro (Jessica.Castro@osec.usda.gov) – Hispanic Serving Institutions
Brenda Wise (Brenda.Wise@osec.usda.gov) – 2501 Grants Staff
Sheree Lesch (Sheree.Lesch@osec.usda.gov) – 2501 Grant Staff
USDA Program Offices – General USDA Locator (202) 720-8732
Cynthia Cuellar (cynthia.cuellar@wdc.usda.gov) – (202) 690-4727 – Farm Service Agency
Ronald Harris (ronald.harris@wdc.usda.gov) – 202-720-6646
Katherine Axelsen (katherine.axelsen@osec.usda.gov) – (202) 720-2032 – Faith-Based/Neighborhood
Partnership Program
Torey Powell (toreypowell@osec.usda.gov) – (202) 720-2032 – Faith-Based/Neighborhood Partnership Program
Henry Searcy (henry.searcy@wdc.usda.gov) – (202) 692-4112 – Rural Development
Billy Cox (billy.cox@ams.usda.gov) – (202)690-0487 – Agricultural Marketing Service
Michael Alston (michael.alton@rma.usda.gov) – Risk Management Agency
I hope this is helpful.
^xÇçt
From: Vincent Cannady [mailto:vincentc@dshe.org]
Sent: Thursday, February 09, 2017 10:11 PM
To: Nicholas, Kenya ‐ OSEC <Kenya.Nicholas@osec.usda.gov>
Cc: King, David ‐ASCR <David.King@ascr.usda.gov>; ruthc@dshe.org; madembad@dshe.org
Subject: Regarding USDA and Protected class of citizens
Importance: High
7
Ms. Nichols
Do you have a grants contact in each agency, someone in DC preferably I also have my Senator’s Office looking at such a
contact list. Maybe you could suggest to the Interim Secretary of a website with such a list especially for minorities
organizations such as disabled, women owned, native American, African American, Hispanic American etc…. This would
be helpful. And Fyi All Agencies fit these demographics or should have programs for the protected classes of citizens or
run afoul of the vast discrimination laws that resulted in the Pigford and other Lawsuits, to be honest DSHE and NVSB
and myself could have went after a settlement when we were in DC, our original plan was to meet with DC
Discrimination lawyers but it was our positive meeting with our Senators that begged us to try this way versus a legally
binding fight sort of change from within.
So if you cannot give me which agencies support unsolicited grant submissions. I will take all 23 agencies under the
USDA Small Businesses Contact (OSBDU), Minority Services ( agencies often have people for veterans, disabled, and
women),
I ask this because your agency is supposed to set up programs to make up for the inadequacies of the USDA and the
other 50 states where African Americans are denied loans, grants, or USDA Services in the rural areas where racism runs
rampant. IN fact I have an idea for a grant for your agency to be able to get the statistics of protected class of citizens
application of services with vast agencies and programs. We seek approval and denial of services or funds. This would
prove the USDA changed under Secretary Vilsack as published. Our Senators have promised letters of support for our
efforts. So again any sort of Office of Small Business Development / Utilization or minority services or funds contact or a
web page with such information if it is available which is why I am ccing ASCR since this is getting into their territory
prior to a Congressional Inquiry,
VR,
Vincent N. Cannady
CEO/President
Disabled Students in Higher Education
17472 S 2950 Road. El Dorado Springs, Mo. 64744
816‐896‐2293‐ Office
866‐206‐6879‐ Fax
vincentc@dshe.org
“Hope begins in the dark, the stubborn hope that if you just show up and try to do the right thing, the dawn will come. You
wait and watch and work: you don’t give up.”
By Ann Lamont
“All growth depends upon activity. There is no development physically or intellectually without effort, and effort means
work.”
By Calvin Coolidge
8
“There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work, and learning from failure.”
By Colin Powell
From: Nicholas, Kenya ‐ OSEC [mailto:Kenya.Nicholas@osec.usda.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, February 8, 2017 9:03 AM
To: vincentc@dshe.org
Subject: RE: Reply ‐ USDA 2501 Grant Status
Good morning Mr. Cannady. We do not have a list of agencies or offices that accept unsolicited proposals. You would
have to contact the agency that is best in line with your project’s mission. I can place you in contact with our field
agencies if needed but we do not have such list.
I hope this is helpful.
^xÇçt
From: Vincent Cannady [mailto:vincentc@dshe.org]
Sent: Thursday, February 02, 2017 6:41 AM
To: Nicholas, Kenya ‐ DM <Kenya.Nicholas@osec.usda.gov>; ruthc@dshe.org
Cc: madembad@dshe.org; info@dshe.org; katiep@dshe.org; OASDVFR2016 <OASDVFR2016@osec.usda.gov>; AGSEC ‐
OES <AGSEC@ocio.usda.gov>; Kristen_Wright@mccaskill.senate.gov; King, David ‐ASCR <David.King@ascr.usda.gov>
Subject: RE: Reply ‐ USDA 2501 Grant Status
Hello Kenya,
Thank You ms eeting with DSHE today. We appreciated the information you provided while being disappointed that you
simply do not have the funds for funding unsolicited grants even if it is for a great program such as Veterans
Occupational Centers (for Agriculture). The Centers of course would serve all protected class of citizens.
While the meeting was informative we need your help in just a few more things. Can you identify all the USDA agencies
that accept unsolicited grants and their veterans representatives. Thank you for help in advance
Vincent N. Cannady
CEO/President
Disabled Students in Higher Education
17472 S 2950 Road. El Dorado Springs, Mo. 64744
816‐896‐2293‐ Office
866‐206‐6879‐ Fax
vincentc@dshe.org
9
“Hope begins in the dark, the stubborn hope that if you just show up and try to do the right thing, the dawn will come. You
wait and watch and work: you don’t give up.”
By Ann Lamont
“All growth depends upon activity. There is no development physically or intellectually without effort, and effort means
work.”
By Calvin Coolidge
“There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work, and learning from failure.”
By Colin Powell
From: Nicholas, Kenya ‐ DM [mailto:Kenya.Nicholas@osec.usda.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, February 1, 2017 12:27 PM
To: vincentc@dshe.org
Cc: madembad@dshe.org; info@dshe.org; katiep@dshe.org; OASDVFR2016 <OASDVFR2016@osec.usda.gov>; AGSEC ‐
OES <AGSEC@ocio.usda.gov>
Subject: Re: Reply ‐ USDA 2501 Grant Status
Good afternoon Mr. Cannady. We have not yet heard from you regarding today’s 1:00 meeting and we have another
meeting at 2:00. If you are in the building, please contact us at the number previously provided below and let us know
your plan to meet with us.
Thanks in advance,
Kenya Nicholas
(202) 720‐6350
Kenya.Nicholas@osec.usda.gov
On Jan 30, 2017, at 4:42 PM, Vincent Cannady <vincentc@dshe.org> wrote:
Ms. Nicholas, this is to confirm we are still meeting February 1st 2017 at 1pm at Office of Advocacy
and Outreach located at:
1400 Independence Avenue, SW – Room 520-A – Jamie Whitten Building
Washington, DC 20250
<image001.jpg>
Vincent N. Cannady
CEO/President
Disabled Students in Higher Education
17472 S 2950 Road. El Dorado Springs, Mo. 64744
816‐896‐2293‐ Office
866‐206‐6879‐ Fax
vincentc@dshe.org
“Hope begins in the dark, the stubborn hope that if you just show up and try to do the right thing, the dawn
will come. You wait and watch and work: you don’t give up.”
By Ann Lamont
10
“All growth depends upon activity. There is no development physically or intellectually without effort, and
effort means work.”
By Calvin Coolidge
“There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work, and learning from failure.”
By Colin Powell
From: Nicholas, Kenya ‐ DM [mailto:Kenya.Nicholas@osec.usda.gov]
Sent: Friday, January 13, 2017 3:55 PM
To: vincentc@dshe.org
Subject: RE: Reply ‐ USDA 2501 Grant Status
As requested, please come to the Office of Advocacy and Outreach located at:
1400 Independence Avenue, SW – Room 520-A – Jamie Whitten Building
Washington, DC 20250
202-720-6350 – Main
(202) 692-0098 – Direct
Please call the main number once you arrive for an escort into the building.
We look forward to the meeting.
From: Vincent Cannady [mailto:vincentc@dshe.org]
Sent: Thursday, January 12, 2017 4:27 PM
To: Nicholas, Kenya ‐ DM <Kenya.Nicholas@osec.usda.gov>; glen_chambers@blunt.senate.gov;
julie_dwyer@mccaskill.senate.gov; info@dshe.org; madembad@dshe.org; katiep@dshe.org
Cc: OASDVFR2016 <OASDVFR2016@osec.usda.gov>; AGSEC ‐ OES <AGSEC@ocio.usda.gov>; King, David
‐ASCR <David.King@ascr.usda.gov>; Kristen_Wright@mccaskill.senate.gov
Subject: RE: Reply ‐ USDA 2501 Grant Status
Hello Kenya,
I am confirming the meeting for 02/01/17 at 1300 hours as I have scheduled a meeting from 9‐11, also
can you please respond with location. Finally, on 02/02/17 9‐12 in the morning timeframe is no longer
available as I have scheduled an additional meeting at that time Therefore can you please confirm 1pm
for the First of February for the meeting?
<image001.jpg>
Vincent N. Cannady
CEO/President
Disabled Students in Higher Education
17472 S 2950 Road. El Dorado Springs, Mo. 64744
816‐896‐2293‐ Office
866‐206‐6879‐ Fax
vincentc@dshe.org
11
“Hope begins in the dark, the stubborn hope that if you just show up and try to do the right thing, the dawn
will come. You wait and watch and work: you don’t give up.”
By Ann Lamont
“All growth depends upon activity. There is no development physically or intellectually without effort, and
effort means work.”
By Calvin Coolidge
“There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work, and learning from failure.”
By Colin Powell
From: Nicholas, Kenya ‐ DM [mailto:Kenya.Nicholas@osec.usda.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, January 11, 2017 1:56 PM
To: vincentc@dshe.org
Cc: OASDVFR2016 <OASDVFR2016@osec.usda.gov>
Subject: RE: Reply ‐ USDA 2501 Grant Status
Thanks Mr. Cannady. We look forward to your response.
^xÇçt
<image002.jpg>
From: Vincent Cannady [mailto:vincentc@dshe.org]
Sent: Wednesday, January 11, 2017 1:37 PM
To: Nicholas, Kenya ‐ DM <Kenya.Nicholas@osec.usda.gov>; AGSEC ‐ OES <AGSEC@ocio.usda.gov>;
King, David ‐ASCR <David.King@ascr.usda.gov>; OASDVFR2016 <OASDVFR2016@osec.usda.gov>;
glen_chambers@blunt.senate.gov; Kristen_Wright@mccaskill.senate.gov
Cc: oasdfr2016@osec.usda.gov; Obineme, Christian ‐DM <Christian.Obineme@osec.usda.gov>
Subject: RE: Reply ‐ USDA 2501 Grant Status
Thank You Ms. Nicholas,
I still want an in person review as I requested but I will use the documents you provided as a basis for
my response to the negative rating decision, while discounting my firm being a disabled services firm for
veterans and minorities . the very people served by the grant. I hope to have a definitive date for
meeting in WDC by COB Tuesday of next week.
<image001.jpg>
Vincent N. Cannady
CEO/President
12
Disabled Students in Higher Education
17472 S 2950 Road. El Dorado Springs, Mo. 64744
816‐896‐2293‐ Office
866‐206‐6879‐ Fax
vincentc@dshe.org
“Hope begins in the dark, the stubborn hope that if you just show up and try to do the right thing, the dawn
will come. You wait and watch and work: you don’t give up.”
By Ann Lamont
“All growth depends upon activity. There is no development physically or intellectually without effort, and
effort means work.”
By Calvin Coolidge
“There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work, and learning from failure.”
By Colin Powell
From: Nicholas, Kenya ‐ DM [mailto:Kenya.Nicholas@osec.usda.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, January 11, 2017 10:39 AM
To: Vincent Cannady <vincentc@dshe.org>; AGSEC ‐ OES <AGSEC@ocio.usda.gov>; King, David ‐ASCR
<David.King@ascr.usda.gov>; OASDVFR2016 <OASDVFR2016@osec.usda.gov>;
glen_chambers@blunt.senate.gov; Kristen_Wright@mccaskill.senate.gov
Cc: oasdfr2016@osec.usda.gov; Obineme, Christian ‐DM <Christian.Obineme@osec.usda.gov>
Subject: RE: Reply ‐ USDA 2501 Grant Status
Good morning Mr. Cannady. Please see the attached summary with the comments provided from the
grant reviewers that rated your application. We also included some comments from the OAO Staff to
better assist with references to the solicitation for applications. We are happy to further discuss with
you at your convenience if you so choose.
Thanks for your interest in our program.
^xÇçt
<image003.jpg>
From: Vincent Cannady [mailto:vincentc@dshe.org]
Sent: Thursday, December 15, 2016 3:43 PM
To: AGSEC ‐ OES <AGSEC@ocio.usda.gov>; King, David ‐ASCR <David.King@ascr.usda.gov>; Nicholas,
Kenya ‐ DM <Kenya.Nicholas@osec.usda.gov>; OASDVFR2016 <OASDVFR2016@osec.usda.gov>;
glen_chambers@blunt.senate.gov; Kristen_Wright@mccaskill.senate.gov
Subject: FW: Reply ‐ USDA 2501 Grant Status
Hello Ms. Nicholas
Here is the email below where I email OASDVFR2016 (OASDVFR2016@osec.usda.gov) and I ask if you
had received our appeal, my internet was out so I sent if from my State of Mo work IPhone. So I asked
you had received my appeal and there was no answer. I am going to check my state of mo account for
the appeal email but at least you could have responded that you did not get my email Ms. Nicholas
13
What about my Grant Scoring Card FOIA Request?
<image001.jpg>
Vincent N. Cannady
CEO/President
Disabled Students in Higher Education
17472 S 2950 Road. El Dorado Springs, Mo. 64744
816‐896‐2293‐ Office
866‐206‐6879‐ Fax
vincentc@dshe.org
“Hope begins in the dark, the stubborn hope that if you just show up and try to do the right thing, the dawn
will come. You wait and watch and work: you don’t give up.”
By Ann Lamont
“All growth depends upon activity. There is no development physically or intellectually without effort, and
effort means work.”
By Calvin Coolidge
“There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work, and learning from failure.”
By Colin Powell
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Slavery is an Inherent Disability

  1. Prisons are nothing more than State owned slaves
    The 13th Amendment to the US Constitution did not abolish slavery in its entirety. The text of the amendment section 1 states  “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.”  Many Americans think that the 13th Amendment outlawed slavery because they are not fully aware of the final part of the clause that states except for punishment for a crime whereof a party shall have been duly convicted. The ink was not even dry on the Amendment when African Americans were being brought into Court for not having a work pass and going to jail without a trial for 10 years or more. Working in Chain gangs that we exactly the same type of chain gangs they had worked on as slaves. In the North there was a surge of arrests of African American men to be used as labor to rebuild both the North and the South.

    One might ask what is happening now as to regard to this “Criminal Slavery”. Mass Incarceration of over 1 million African Americans has made many activists and scholars examine just how this phenomenon came into being. Prisoners describe there lives in terms that one might read in the Slave Narratives. According to the NAACP the following facts are true
    Incarceration Trends in America

    • From 1980 to 2008, the number of people incarcerated in America quadrupled-from roughly 500,000 to 2.3 million people
    • Today, the US is 5% of the World population and has 25% of world prisoners.
    • Combining the number of people in prison and jail with those under parole or probation supervision, 1 in ever y 31 adults, or 3.2 percent of the population is under some form of correctional control

    Racial Disparities in Incarceration

    • African Americans now constitute nearly 1 million of the total 2.3 million incarcerated population
    • African Americans are incarcerated at nearly six times the rate of whites
    • Together, African American and Hispanics comprised 58% of all prisoners in 2008, even though African Americans and Hispanics make up approximately one quarter of the US population
    • According to Unlocking America, if African American and Hispanics were incarcerated at the same rates of whites, today’s prison and jail populations would decline by approximately 50%
    • One in six black men had been incarcerated as of 2001. If current trends continue, one in three black males born today can expect to spend time in prison during his lifetime
    • 1 in 100 African American women are in prison
    • Nationwide, African-Americans represent 26% of juvenile arrests, 44% of youth who are detained, 46% of the youth who are judicially waived to criminal court, and 58% of the youth admitted to state prisons (Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice).

    Drug Sentencing Disparities

    • About 14 million Whites and 2.6 million African Americans report using an illicit drug
    • 5 times as many Whites are using drugs as African Americans, yet African Americans are sent to prison for drug offenses at 10 times the rate of Whites
    • African Americans represent 12% of the total population of drug users, but 38% of those arrested for drug offenses, and 59% of those in state prison for a drug offense.
    • African Americans serve virtually as much time in prison for a drug offense (58.7 months) as whites do for a violent offense (61.7 months). (Sentencing Project)

    Contributing Factors

    • Inner city crime prompted by social and economic isolation
    • Crime/drug arrest rates: African Americans represent 12% of monthly drug users, but comprise 32% of persons arrested for drug possession
    • “Get tough on crime” and “war on drugs” policies
    • Mandatory minimum sentencing, especially disparities in sentencing for crack and powder cocaine possession
    • In 2002, blacks constituted more than 80% of the people sentenced under the federal crack cocaine laws and served substantially more time in prison for drug offenses than did whites, despite that fact that more than 2/3 of crack cocaine users in the U.S. are white or Hispanic
    • “Three Strikes”/habitual offender policies
    • Zero Tolerance policies as a result of perceived problems of school violence; adverse affect on black children.
    • 35% of black children grades 7-12 have been suspended or expelled at some point in their school careers compared to 20% of Hispanics and 15% of whites

    Effects of Incarceration

    • Jail reduces work time of young people over the next decade by 25-30 percent when compared with arrested youths who were not incarcerated
    • Jails and prisons are recognized as settings where society’s infectious diseases are highly concentrated
    • Prison has not been proven as a rehabilitation for behavior, as two-thirds of prisoners will reoffend

    Exorbitant Cost of Incarceration: Is it Worth It?

    • About $70 billion dollars are spent on corrections yearly
    • Prisons and jails consume a growing portion of the nearly $200 billion we spend annually on public safety
    1 in 3 African American men go to Prison, that is a fact. The Criminal Injustice system is racially biased when you consider that African Americans make up only 13% of the US Population but almost 47% of the US Prison Population. The conviction rate for petty crime and drug possion have left many African American in Prison for life for stealing a shirt worth 150 dollars with Regan’s 3 Strikes your out law. Mandatory minimum sentences given to African Americans who were lied to by their Public Defender , who forced them to admit guilt keeps some African American men in jail for life. What is the reason behind the push to Mass Incarcerate African American men is the question that keeps Scholars and Activists like myself awake at night.
    1.The incarceration rates disproportionately impact men of color: 1 in every 15 African American men and 1 in every 36 Hispanic men are incarcerated in comparison to 1 in every 106 white men.
    2. According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics,  one in three black men can expect to go to prison in their lifetime. Individuals of color have a disproportionate number of encounters with law enforcement, indicating that racial profiling continues to be a problem. A report by the Department of Justice found that blacks and Hispanics were approximately  three times more likely to be searchedduring a traffic stop than white motorists. African Americans were twice as likely to be arrested and almost  four times as likely to experience the use of force during encounters with the police.
    3. Students of color face harsher punishments in school than their white peers, leading to a higher number of youth of color incarcerated. Black and Hispanic students represent more than  70 percent of those involved in school-related arrests or referrals to law enforcement. Currently, African Americans make up two-fifths and Hispanics  one-fifth of confined youth today.
    4. According to recent data by the Department of Education, African American students are arrested far more often than their white classmates. The data showed that  96,000 students were arrested and 242,000 referred to law enforcement by schools during the 2009-10 school year. Of those students, black and Hispanic students made up more than  70 percent of arrested or referred students. Harsh school punishments, from suspensions to arrests, have led to high numbers of youth of color coming into contact with the juvenile-justice system and at an earlier age.
    5. The war on drugs has been waged primarily in communities of color where people of color are more likely to receive higher offenses.According to the  Human Rights Watch, people of color are no more likely to use or sell illegal drugs than whites, but they have higher rate of arrests. African Americans comprise  14 percent of regular drug users but are 37 percent of those arrested for drug offenses. From 1980 to 2007 about  one in three of the 25.4 million adults arrested for drugs was African American.
    author of Rooted in Slavery: Prison Labor Exploitation “It may surprise some people that as the number of people without jobs increases, the number of working people actually increases—they become prison laborers. Everyone inside has a job. There are currently over 70 factories in California’s 33 prisons alone. Prisoners do everything from textile work and construction, to manufacturing and service work. Prisoners make shoes, clothing, and detergent; they do dental lab work, recycling, metal production, and wood production; they operate dairies, farms, and slaughterhouses
     To understand the conditions that have allowed such an exploitative industry to develop, we have to look at the origin of the United States prison system itself. Before the abolition of slavery there was no real prison system in the United States. Punishment for crime consisted of physical torture, referred to as corporal or capital punishment. While the model prison in the United States was built in Auburn, New York in 1817, it wasn’t until the end of the Civil War, with the official abolition of slavery, that the prison system took hold.
    In 1865, the 13th Amendment officially abolished slavery for all people except those convicted of a crime and opened the door for mass criminalization. Prisons were built in the South as part of the backlash to Black Reconstruction and as a mechanism to re-enslave Black workers. In the late 19th-century South, an extensive prison system was developed in the interest of maintaining the racial and economic relationship of slavery.
    Louisiana’s famous Angola Prison illustrates this history best. In 1880, this 8000-acre family plantation was purchased by the state of Louisiana and converted into a prison. Slave quarters became cell units. Now expanded to 18,000 acres, the Angola plantation is tilled by prisoners working the land—a chilling picture of modern day chattel slavery.” 
    To conclude this paper on the 13th Amendment converting Slavery from personal property to property of the State I must implore historians of all colors to not shy away from the issue as I have experienced trying to get the US Government to amend the “except as punishment for a crime, whereof the party has been duly convicted” I urge anyone reading this paper to write, call or blog about the issue. Share the paper on Facebook and Twitter. Understand why the police are killing us without cause because to them we are nothing more than slaves. And the police are nothing more than the Pattyrollers that use to maim and kill slaves